VIDEO

Since 2011 Syria became a playground of a brutal civil war. Till the end of 2017 more than 400 000 people lost their lives and another 12 000 000 were forced to leave their homes.

In October 2017, after a 4 months long battle, the so called capital of ISIS – Raqqa was liberated, but fully destroyed. The whole population (around 300 000 people) of the former economic center of the region was forced to flee. Many of them find new homе in refugees camp as Ain Issa camp – a place without conditions to satisfy even the simplest human needs.

Now, some of the civilians try to return, but face demolished houses, mined buildings and misery. Even the-well paid employees before the war now live on bread and tea.

The “lost generation” includes the children who grow up with no education, families and future. The 9 years old Dozan is one of the “gasoline boys”, forced to sell petrol for just 50 cents per day, not enough even for food. His father was killed by ISIS, his mother and brothers are missing. His dreams do not include toys but only memories of the life before.

Meanwhile many people try to continue their everyday life. In Qamishli, the Kurdish fighter from YPG Masoud has just few days to marry his long-standing love Heven before he goes back to the frontline of Deir ez-Zor. Optimistically, he believes in the future, the peace and the independence of Syrian Kurdistan.

The [ Rojava Diaries ] project brings together several stories from the war-torn northern Syria in a short video narrative.

Music: Core Chant, a song by Meredith Monk
You can support our work by liking our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/lens2lens.bg/


Prayer for rain

Every summer for 25 years a group of men in Dolni Voden neighborhood of Asenovgrad perform a particular ritual.

 


Bulgarian citizens, including World War II veterans, gathered at the Red Army monument in the capital Sofia on Wednesday to mark Victory Day.


The graffiti are the true face of the city. For sure the grey walls of Sofia would not have so many stories to tell if they weren’t painted.

This says the graffiti artist with the nickname Punto, who has been practicing this art for 12 years.